Daily Archives February 13, 2018

Star Talk: Exploring Space… from Earth

February 13, 2018
/ / /

exploringspacefromearth“Exploring Space… from Earth” with Dr. Marianne Mader

Abstract: Learn how planetary scientists explore other planets here on Earth, through comparative planetology and meteoritics, and how we are preparing for future space missions by conducting terrestrial analogue missions. Dr. Mader will share stories from the field, including her work in the Arctic and Antarctica. Step into the shoes of a geologist and try your hand at meteorite hunting in this interactive presentation.

——–

About the speaker: Dr. Mader has dedicated her career to sharing her love for science and space exploration through innovative public engagement, participatory education, and planetary science research. Currently, the Managing Director of Earth & Space/Fossils & Evolution at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM), she leads multidisciplinary initiatives to help people understand the Earth, our solar system and how life evolved over time. With over 13 years of research & field experience, Dr. Mader has studied some of the oldest rocks on Earth in Greenland, explored impact craters across the globe, and collected meteorites in Antarctica. She’s worked with the Canadian Space Agency, NASA, and numerous Canadian space companies. She’s a Visiting Lecturer at the International Space University, and her education includes a PhD in Planetary Science, MSc in Space Studies, and an MSc in Earth Sciences.

——-

Date and Location: 7:00 PM Feb. 28, Lash Miller Chemical Laboratories (LM), Room 161

Telescope observing: 8:00 PM on 14th floor of McLennan Physical Laboratories (MP) (weather permitting) — you will be guided to the telescopes.

Read More

February 2018: Picture of the Month

February 13, 2018
/ / /

spacex

Last week, a car orbited the Earth. The car, created by humans and robots on the Earth, was launched by the SpaceX Company to demonstrate the ability of its Falcon Heavy Rocket to place spacecraft out in the Solar System. Purposely fashioned to be whimsical, the iconic car was thought a better demonstration object than concrete blocks. A mannequin clad in a spacesuit — dubbed the Starman — sits in the driver’s seat. The featured image is a frame from a video taken by one of three cameras mounted on the car. These cameras, connected to the car’s battery, are now out of power. The car, attached to a second stage booster, soon left Earth orbit and will orbit the Sun between Earth and the asteroid belt indefinitely — perhaps until billions of years from now when our Sun expands into a Red Giant. If ever recovered, what’s left of the car may become a unique window into technologies developed on Earth in the 20th and early 21st centuries.

For more information, check out APOD!

Read More
  • ASX 2016-2017 Sponsors

DISCLAIMER: The content of this web site is entirely the responsibility of a campus organization which is independent from the University of Toronto. The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the University. The University of Toronto shall not be liable for any damage resulting from the use or misuse of the contents of this web site.

[This webspace is being hosted by University of Toronto Student Life]