ASX 15th Annual Symposium “Into the Unknown: The Future of Space Exploration”

January 3, 2018
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asx15cover

Hey everybody! As posted before, this year’s ASX Symposium will tackle the challenges of human space exploration. The Symposium will feature two speakers, Dr. John B. Charles (NASA Human Research Program) and Prof. Soon-Jo Chung (CalTech; Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and will be held on February 2nd, from 6:00pm-9:00pm in the JJR MacLeod Auditorium (1 King’s College Cir, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8) Earth Sciences Centre (33 Willcocks St, Toronto, ON M5S) room 1050.

Tickets are now available on Eventbrite.

And for more instantaneous updates on the Symposium please checkout our Facebook event page.

See y’all there!

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January 2018: Picture of the Month

January 3, 2018
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orion

Happy New Year everybody! To begin the year we’re doing something a little different. This month’s image is taken by Afsheen Rane, an amateur astronomer at University of Toronto. Photographed is the Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42) which is around 1300 light years away from Earth. Its brightness allows it to be visible to the naked eye in the night sky and makes it a popular choice amongst amateur astronomers to observe.

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ASX 15th Symposium Reveal!

December 11, 2017
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asx15

We know that it is extremely difficult for us to send vehicles to outer space, especially if we are to send a human in it. So what does it really take for us to travel beyond our planet and solar system and to survive under “zero-gravity”? Join us in our 15th Annual Symposium as Dr. Charles (NASA Human Research Program) and Prof. Chung (CalTech; Jet Propulsion Laboratory) address the capabilities and challenges of human technology and abilities in space.

That’s it for now, have a Happy Holidays and keep an eye out for more symposium details in the New Year!

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December 2017: Picture of the Month

December 3, 2017
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north_america

Fans of our fair planet might recognize the outlines of these cosmic clouds. On the left, bright emission outlined by dark, obscuring dust lanes seems to trace a continental shape, lending the popular name North America Nebula to the emission region cataloged as NGC 7000. To the right, just off the North America Nebula’s east coast, is IC 5070, whose profile suggests the Pelican Nebula. The two bright nebulae are about 1,500 light-years away, part of the same large and complex star forming region, almost as nearby as the better-known Orion Nebula. At that distance, the 6 degree wide field of view would span 150 light-years. This careful cosmic portrait uses narrow band images to highlight the bright ionization fronts and the characteristic red glow from atomic hydrogen gas. These nebulae can be seen with binoculars from a dark location. Look northeast of bright star Deneb in the constellation of Cygnus the Swan.

For more information, check out APOD!

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