September 2015: Picture of the Month

October 1, 2015
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water_on_mars

These dark streaks seen on Mars, called recurring slope lineae, are inferred to have been formed by flowing liquid water. Recently, by using an imaging spectrometer on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), scientists have detected signatures of hydrated salts on slopes where the mysterious streaks are seen. These streaks appear to flow over time; flowing down slopes during warm seasons and fading in colder seasons. The findings of hydrated salts hints the idea that the freezing point of a liquid brine is lower, making it possible for shallow subsurface flow.

For more information, click HERE.

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Space Matters

October 1, 2015
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As a club, our purpose is to inspire and educate students and the general public about astronomy and space. This is why we stand with SEDS-CAN in urging our next government to invest in Canada’s space sector. The Canadian Space Agency’s core budget was set at $300 million in 1999. And it should be increased, at least to account for inflation, to ensure for a brighter future for all Canadian students.

To read about why space matters to students, click HERE.

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Star Talk: Cosmology, Cell Phones, and Video Games

September 19, 2015
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star_talk_sept_2015Welcome back to a new school year! We will be continuing our monthly ASX’s Star Talk on September 24th at 8pm. Our speaker is Keith Vanderlinde, an Assistant Professor at the Dunlap Institute and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Toronto.

Prof. Keith Vanderlinde has spent the last decade building and using telescopes to study the Universe: its composition, history, and eventual fate. Aided by technologies that make cell phones possible, and which make video games a staple of modern culture, he and colleagues from across Canada are building a massive new radio telescope in Penticton, B.C., which will map a larger volume of space than ever attempted before.

After the talk, join us for a night of stargazing. Our targets: the Moon and M13, the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules.

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August 2015: Picture of the Month

September 1, 2015
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CygnusCrescent_Swift_6023Taken by Paul C. Swift, this image spans 6 degrees and captures the beautiful landscape that lies along the plane of the Milky Way and the center of the northern constellation Cygnus the Swan. Notable celestial objects in this featured image are the bright supergiant star Gamma Cygni (at the upper left), IC 1318 (popularly known as the Butterfly Nebula, located to the left of Gamma Cygni – can you find it?), and NGC 6888 (the Crescent Nebula, located at the lower right).

For the original post, click HERE.

For more of Paul C. Swift’s photos, click HERE.

 

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