Space Trivia — Radio Astronomy

Interested in another round of Trivia, drawn from our October Star Talk on radio astronomy? Join the ASX for a fun round of Kahoot! on November 18 at 6:30 pm!You can play alone or with a team of friends, and we’ll keep score — neat prizes will be available for the top players.

Zoom link to be announced!

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Star Talk: The New Era of Radio Astronomy

Radio telescopes — such as the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME), HIRAX, and the planned CHORD — will lead to unprecedented advances in astronomy. How will they shape future research? To find out more, join us online on Wednesday, October 28 at 6:00 pm.Abstract: “In recent years, the exponential growth of available computing power has spurred a revolution in radio astronomy. Digital processing of radio light has replaced traditional mirrors and imaging optics, with huge arrays of smaller detectors now beginning to supplant the monolithic dishes of prior years. Canada has become a leader in this new arena, with the recently-built CHIME telescope displaying unprecedented survey sensitivity, and upcoming arrays like HIRAX and CHORD set to redefine the field. I will discuss these developments, recent results, and upcoming instruments.” — Professor VanderlindeBiography: Dr. Keith Vanderlinde is an Assistant Professor at U of T’s David A. Dunlap Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics as well at the Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics. In his research, Prof. Vanderlinde studies the Large Scale Structure, working on the South Pole Telescope and CHIME.

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Star Talk: Hands-On Astronomy: Building Instruments to Measure Our Cosmos

Abstract:
You may be familiar with some of the fantastic technology and instruments to do astronomy and the pictures we get with them of our cosmos, but how do these telescopes and cameras actually get built? What do experimental astrophysics do all day? I will discuss astronomical instrumentation and what technology we use to measure the sky across the electromagnetic spectrum from UV telescopes to superconducting transition edge sensors. I will describe how these instruments are created and what the careers of astronomy “builders” are like. I will also show some images of the sky taken with different instruments and describe the discoveries they have allowed astronomers to make.

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Star Talk: How to Measure the Universe’s Oldest Light

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/97367355869pwd=VUFnZ292NklxTHozQnVBVFpMMzNIZz09
Password:
im84Gr

It may surprise you to know that we can still observe the Big Bang, in a way! In fact, every time you accidentally flip to TV static, you’re watching a fragment of it right there! To find out more about this echo of the spawning of the universe, join us online on Wednesday, August 12 at 6:30PM. From that first, immense explosion to now, Dr. Adam Hincks will be delving into the details of the cosmic microwave background radiation! As always, everyone is welcome!

Lecture Abstract:
How to Measure the Universe’s Oldest Light and What it Tells UsThe cosmic microwave background (CMB) is the glow of the
universe from soon after the Big Bang. Today, we can observe this nearly 14 billion-year-old light with microwave telescopes and use it to determine some of the most fundamental properties of the cosmos, such as its age, what it is made out of, and how fast it is expanding. We can also learn how the universe behaved in its very first instants. I will introduce this exciting science and describe how we observe the CMB, focusing in particular on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and the Simons Observatory—the first currently observing and the second under development—located in the north of Chile.

About the Speaker:
Dr. Adam Hincks is the inaugural holder of the Sutton Family Chair in Science, Christianity and Cultures at U of T’s David A. Dunlap Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics. Dr. Hincks is an ordained Jesuit priest, and is affiliated with both the Vatican Observatory and the Simons Observatory where he researches the CMB

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