Special Star Talk: So, You Want to Go to Mars?

star_talk_mar2018“So You Want to Go to Mars?” with Dr. John B. Charles

Date & Location: 7:00 PM-9:00 PM Mar. 23, McLennan Physical Laboratories (MP), Room 102, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 1A7

For everyone who was disappointed by our cancelled symposium, Dr. John B. Charles (one of the original symposium speakers) has agreed to come to Toronto to give a special Star Talk!

Light snacks and refreshments will be provided following the talk!

Abstract: So, you want to go to Mars? Long-range planning for exploration-class missions emphasizes the need for anticipating the medical and human factors aspects of such expeditions. Physiological stresses will come from environmental factors such as prolonged exposure to radiation, weightlessness while en route, and low gravity and a toxic atmosphere while on Mars. Psychological stressors will include remoteness from Earth, confinement, and potential interpersonal conflicts, all complicated by circadian alterations. Medical risks including trauma must be considered. The role of such risk-modifying influences as artificial gravity and improved propulsion technologies to shorten round-trip time will also be discussed. NASA’s on-going efforts to reduce the risks to humans on exploration-class missions, including the year-long ISS expedition and its Twins Study, will be presented.

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About the speaker: Dr. John B. Charles is the former Chief Scientist at the NASA Human Research Program. Dr. Charles earned his bachelor of science in biophysics at The Ohio State University and his doctorate in physiology and biophysics at the University of Kentucky. He worked at NASA’s Johnson Space centre from 1983 – 2018, where he investigated the cardiovascular effects of space flight on Space Shuttle astronauts and on crew members of the Russian space station Mir. As the chief of the International Science Office of NASA’s Human Research Program, he led space life sciences planning for the joint U.S./Russian one-year mission on the ISS. Additionally, he is a fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association and a full member of the International Academy of Astronautics, has published over 60 scientific articles, and has received several professional awards.

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Star Talk: Exploring Space… from Earth

exploringspacefromearth“Exploring Space… from Earth” with Dr. Marianne Mader

Abstract: Learn how planetary scientists explore other planets here on Earth, through comparative planetology and meteoritics, and how we are preparing for future space missions by conducting terrestrial analogue missions. Dr. Mader will share stories from the field, including her work in the Arctic and Antarctica. Step into the shoes of a geologist and try your hand at meteorite hunting in this interactive presentation.

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About the speaker: Dr. Mader has dedicated her career to sharing her love for science and space exploration through innovative public engagement, participatory education, and planetary science research. Currently, the Managing Director of Earth & Space/Fossils & Evolution at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM), she leads multidisciplinary initiatives to help people understand the Earth, our solar system and how life evolved over time. With over 13 years of research & field experience, Dr. Mader has studied some of the oldest rocks on Earth in Greenland, explored impact craters across the globe, and collected meteorites in Antarctica. She’s worked with the Canadian Space Agency, NASA, and numerous Canadian space companies. She’s a Visiting Lecturer at the International Space University, and her education includes a PhD in Planetary Science, MSc in Space Studies, and an MSc in Earth Sciences.

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Date and Location: 7:00 PM Feb. 28, Lash Miller Chemical Laboratories (LM), Room 161

Telescope observing: 8:00 PM on 14th floor of McLennan Physical Laboratories (MP) (weather permitting) — you will be guided to the telescopes.

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Star Talk: Computer Vision on Mars REDUX

computer_vision_on_mars“Computer Vision on Mars “, with Professor Jonathan Kelly

Hey everybody! As you may have remembered in November this Star Talk was cancelled due to some unforeseen events, so we’re gonna give this one more go!

Abstract: Modern computer vision technologies have been key to improving our understanding of the Red Planet over the past 15 years. Vision systems are deployed on-orbit (e.g., the HiRISE camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter), on the surface (e.g., the vision sensors on the rovers Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity), and have also been used for safe entry, descent, and landing of recent robotic platforms reaching the surface. In this talk, I will review the design and use of several of these vision systems, including, for example, how the Curiosity rover makes use of visual navigation methods when wheel odometry is unreliable (rolling over sandy terrain).

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About the speaker: Professor Jonathan Kelly is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the Director of the Space & Terrestrial Autonomous Robotic Systems (STARS) Laboratory. Before joining the University of Toronto, he was a Postdoctoral Associate in the Robust Robotics Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and he completed his Ph.D. in the Robotic Embedded Systems Laboratory at the University of Southern California.

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Date and Location: 7:10 PM Jan. 24th, McLennan Physical Laboratories (MP), Room 137

Telescope observing: 8:00 PM on 14th floor of McLennan Physical Laboratories (MP) (weather permitting) — you will be guided to the telescopes.

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Important Notice for Nov. 29, 2017 Star Talk

Hello everyone,

Sadly, the Star Talk which was originally planned for 7:10-8:00 tonight is cancelled because Professor Jonathan Kelly is sick and cannot make it to the event.

HOWEVER, for those who are interested, we will still be holding the telescope observing session from 8:00-9:00pm and we will be meeting in the lobby of McLennan at 8:00

We sincerely apologize for this last-minute change of plan.

– The ASX executive team

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Star Talk: Computer Vision on Mars

computer_vision_on_mars“Computer Vision on Mars “, with Professor Jonathan Kelly

Abstract: Modern computer vision technologies have been key to improving our understanding of the Red Planet over the past 15 years. Vision systems are deployed on-orbit (e.g., the HiRISE camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter), on the surface (e.g., the vision sensors on the rovers Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity), and have also been used for safe entry, descent, and landing of recent robotic platforms reaching the surface. In this talk, I will review the design and use of several of these vision systems, including, for example, how the Curiosity rover makes use of visual navigation methods when wheel odometry is unreliable (rolling over sandy terrain).

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About the speaker: Professor Jonathan Kelly is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the Director of the Space & Terrestrial Autonomous Robotic Systems (STARS) Laboratory. Before joining the University of Toronto, he was a Postdoctoral Associate in the Robust Robotics Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and he completed his Ph.D. in the Robotic Embedded Systems Laboratory at the University of Southern California.

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Date and Location: 7:10 PM Nov. 29th, McLennan Physical Laboratories (MP), Room 202

Telescope observing: 8:00 PM on 14th floor of McLennan Physical Laboratories (MP) (weather permitting) — you will be guided to the telescopes.

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