Interacting galaxies are understood to be common - in fact, repeated galaxy encounters can ultimately result in a merger of one single galaxy.
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This recently released image from the Hubble Space Telescope shows long filaments of dust and gas appearing to circle a supermassive black hole.
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A triple star system is forming within the dusty disk some 750 light years away in the Perseus molecular cloud.
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This is the new and highest resolution map of the universe's most abundant gas. hydrogen.
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What ifs Scientific Poster Competition

April 1, 2017
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What ifs Scientific Poster Competition is a competition organized by the Astronomy and Space
Exploration Society (ASX). ASX is a non-profit organization run by the University of Toronto
space community in Ontario, Canada. ASX’s purpose is to educate, excite, and inspire students,
professionals, and the general public about astronomy and space.

The aim of the competition is to provide students in grades 9-12 with an opportunity to explore
the field of astronomy and space science. Students will investigate a topic from an active research
area and share their work with other space enthusiasts.

Students can choose to work individually or form a team with a maximum of three members.
(Note: only one person in the team needs to fill out the registration form, but they will need to
provide names and email addresses of the other team members.) Students may work with students
in different grades (9-12) and from different schools, if they would like.

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ASX Annual General Meeting for 2017-2018 Elections

March 31, 2017
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ASX will be holding its Annual General Meeting to elect the 2017-2018 executive team, and celebrate the end of a great year with FREE food!

Date: Monday, April 3, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
Location: Astronomy Building (50 St.George Street), Room 114

If you are a student at the University of Toronto and you are an ASX member (i.e., you are on our mailing list), then you are eligible to vote and to run for an executive position. To run, email space.society@utoronto.ca before 11:59 pm on Sunday, April 2. You can state up to three executive positions that you intend on running for in order of preference, and come prepared with a short speech of no more than 3 minutes for each position. If you wish to run for more than one position, please tailor your speech to each of the positions you intend on running for. At the AGM, voting will follow the procedure outlined in the ASX Constitution, section 6.
*Note that if a candidate wishes to run for President, Vice President, Treasurer, or Secretary, then they require a nomination from two other ASX members.

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Star Talk: The Algonquin Pulsar Project

March 11, 2017
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star_talk_feb “The Algonquin Pulsar Project”, with Professor Ue-Li Pen

Abstract: The Algonquin Radio Observatory (ARO), built in 1965, along with the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) are the first to achieve long baseline interferometry (VLBI), whereby two single-dish telescopes are combined to provide the same resolution as a telescope the size of Canada.

CITA, the Dunlap Institute, and the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics collectively have continued the Canadian VLBI tradition with a new program to conduct transnational interferometric observations of pulsars and fast radio bursts (FRBs). The former has been named “scintillometry,” whose purpose is to utilize VLBI on earth in combination with scattering in the interstellar medium (ISM) to create an effective telescope size of ~astronomical unit to study pulsars and the intervening matter between us and them. The latter could provide the first ever spatial localization of FRBs.

Pulsar VLBI is located at the Algonquin Radio Observatory, which is visited frequently for data collection. The Crab pulsar will be studied using scintillometry techniques and VLBI. To obtain better images, one would need a telescope with a larger diameter. An easy way to increase diameter was to combine the signals from multiple telescopes using them as an interferometer thus creating VLBI. The data collected at Algonquin are synced up to data collected with other telescopes across the world. The radio waves that is emitted from the pulses propagate to telescopes on earth directly and indirectly via deflections on a scattering screen in the interstellar medium in space. The different paths interfere thus causing scintillation. By observing the scintillation with multiple telescopes on Earth, it is possible to estimate the pulsar’s position with extremely high precision.

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January 2017: Picture of the Month

February 5, 2017
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The spiky stars in the foreground of this cosmic portrait are well within the Milky Way while the two galaxies are at a distance of 300 million light-years from us. Cataloged as Arp 273 (also as UGC 1810), the distorted appearance of these galaxies are due to gravitational tides caused by close encounters between the pair. Interacting galaxies are understood to be common – in fact, repeated galaxy encounters can ultimately result in a merger of one single galaxy.

For more information, check out APOD!

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