This view of the night side of Pluto was captured by New Horizons last July when the spacecraft was 21000 kilometres from the planet.
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Two bright galaxies can be observed in this sharp telescopic field of view.
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The Einstein ring, a result of gravitational lensing.
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One of the most massive stars on record.
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Although space travel is not yet possible, consider visiting the planet Kepler-16b in a binary star system.
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June 2016: Picture of the Month

July 2, 2016
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crescent_view_pluto

This view of the night side of Pluto was captured by New Horizons last July when the spacecraft was 21000 kilometres from the planet (or 19 minutes after its closest approach). The photo also reveals the complex layers of the Plutonian’s hazy atmosphere. The landscape seen in the crescent view includes the southern areas of the nitrogen ice plains known as Sputnik Planum and the Norgay Montes.

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May 2016: Picture of the Month

June 4, 2016
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may_potd_ng5078

Two bright galaxies can be observed in this sharp telescopic field of view; barred spiral galaxy, NGC 5101 (top right), and the edge-on galaxy, NGC 5708 (bottom left). The two galaxies are separated by about 0.5 degrees (or the full width of the moon). Found within the constellation Hydra, both galaxies are estimated to be around 90 million light-years away and similar in size to that of our own galaxy.

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April 2016: Picture of the Month

May 2, 2016
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SDP81_alma_9602

The foreground galaxy, (shown in blue) taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, acts as a gravitational lens. Surrounding it is the background galaxy, taken by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array, (shown in red). The alignment is so precise that the distant galaxy is distorted into a ring around the foreground galaxy; the ring formation known as an Einstein ring.

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March 2016: Picture of the Month

April 2, 2016
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NGC6357_hubble_960Estimates made from distance, brightness and standard solar models had placed one star in the open cluster, Pismis 24, to be over 200 times the mass of the Sun. The star is the brightness object located at the top of the featured image. Even the component stars are still 100 times the mass of the Sun. At the bottom of the image, stars are still forming in the emission nebula NGC 6357.

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ASX 2016 Annual General Meeting

April 1, 2016
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agm

The school year is coming to a close; it’s time to say goodbye to some of the old executive members and say hello to the new ones. ASX will be holding its Annual General Meeting to elect the 2016-2017 executive team, and celebrate the end of a great year with FREE pizza and a space-related movie (TBA).

Date: Wednesday April 6, 2016
Time: 7:15 PM
Location: Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) Room 2227

If you are a student at the University of Toronto and you are an ASX member (i.e., you are on our mailing list), then you are eligible to vote and to run for an executive position. To run, email space.society@utoronto.ca before 11:59 pm on Monday April 4. You must state up to three executive positions that you intend on running for in order of preference, and come prepared with a short speech of no more than 3 minutes for each position. If you wish to run for more than one position, please tailor your speech to each of the positions you intend on running for. At the AGM, voting will follow the procedure outlined in the ASX Constitution, section 6.2.

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