Star Talk: Water, Water Everywhere?

Water, water everywhere?

Our understanding of our own solar system has changed significantly since the advent of spacecraft exploration. Water was once believed very scarce in our corner of the galaxy but we now realize this is not the case.From understanding where our own planetโ€™s water riches originated to the proliferation of the so called water worlds, this presentation will discuss the evolution of this โ€œsea changeโ€ in thinking and its implication for the search for life on exoplanets.

๐—š๐˜‚๐—ฒ๐˜€๐˜ ๐—ฏ๐—ถ๐—ผ๐—ด๐—ฟ๐—ฎ๐—ฝ๐—ต๐˜†: Dr. Paul Delaney is a Professor at York University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy and the inaugural Carswell Chair for the Public Understanding of Astronomy. He is the coordinator of the York University Observatory, and promotes the use of its telescopes for education, research, and public outreach.Zoom link will be posted closer to the event!

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Star Talk: The New Era of Radio Astronomy

Radio telescopes โ€” such as the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME), HIRAX, and the planned CHORD โ€” will lead to unprecedented advances in astronomy. How will they shape future research? To find out more, join us online on Wednesday, October 28 at 6:00 pm.Abstract: “In recent years, the exponential growth of available computing power has spurred a revolution in radio astronomy. Digital processing of radio light has replaced traditional mirrors and imaging optics, with huge arrays of smaller detectors now beginning to supplant the monolithic dishes of prior years. Canada has become a leader in this new arena, with the recently-built CHIME telescope displaying unprecedented survey sensitivity, and upcoming arrays like HIRAX and CHORD set to redefine the field. I will discuss these developments, recent results, and upcoming instruments.” โ€” Professor VanderlindeBiography: Dr. Keith Vanderlinde is an Assistant Professor at U of T’s David A. Dunlap Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics as well at the Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics. In his research, Prof. Vanderlinde studies the Large Scale Structure, working on the South Pole Telescope and CHIME.

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Star Talk: Hands-On Astronomy: Building Instruments to Measure Our Cosmos

Abstract:
You may be familiar with some of the fantastic technology and instruments to do astronomy and the pictures we get with them of our cosmos, but how do these telescopes and cameras actually get built? What do experimental astrophysics do all day? I will discuss astronomical instrumentation and what technology we use to measure the sky across the electromagnetic spectrum from UV telescopes to superconducting transition edge sensors. I will describe how these instruments are created and what the careers of astronomy “builders” are like. I will also show some images of the sky taken with different instruments and describe the discoveries they have allowed astronomers to make.

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Star Talk: Statistics Meets Astronomy

ZOOM LINK:
https://zoom.us/j/99247575191?pwd=c0c1S25KVnI1Vkk5OExqTW1CVExkdz09
PASSWORD: 2dnVkF

Link to Facebook Event page:https://www.facebook.com/events/285642659511920/

Big data permeates every facet of modern society, and astronomy is no exception! What do astrophysicists do with the massive amounts of information being constantly recorded by telescopes? To find out, join ASX for our first-ever, socially-distant online Star Talk on Wednesday, July 8. From analysing the behavior of single stars to calculating the mass of the Milky Way, Professor Gwendolyn Eadie will be elucidating the ways in which statistics meets astronomy! As always, everyone is welcome!

Lecture Abstract:
Statistics meets Astronomy: Challenges in Time and Space

Astronomy, like so many other disciplines, has entered an era of big data — large telescopes and all-sky surveys are bringing in petabytes amount of data on a daily basis. The hope is that these large data sets will help us not only untangle mysteries of the universe but also help us discover new phenomena. At the same time, these data sets often come with challenges that require sophisticated statistical analysis. In this talk, I will summarize some of the exciting science being done by my Astrostatistics Research Team at the University of Toronto, from studies of individual stars, to open star clusters and the entire Milky Way Galaxy.

About the Speaker:
Dr. Gwendolyn Eadie is an Assistant Professor jointly-appointed between U of T’s David A. Dunlap Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics and Department of Statistical Sciences. Prof. Eadie is an expert in astrostatistics, and is currently applying modern statistical methods to the study of the Milky Way.

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January Star Talk: Black Holes in 2020

It’s time for our first event of 2020! Black hole are everywhere in popular science and science fiction, but what do we really know about these ultra-dense objects? If you would like to know more, join ASX for our Star Talk on Wednesday, January 29, in Lash Miller Chemical Laboratories (LM), Room 161. Professor Chris Matzner will be illuminating the darkness surrounding black holes, by elaborating on the state of our understanding in 2020! The free, public lecture itself is from 7PM-8PM followed, weather permitting, by a free, public telescope viewing atop MP. Everyone is welcome!

Lecture Abstract:
Once just a speculation, the existence of black holes is now an established fact. But what are they? Where do they come from? How were they found? What consequences do they have in our Universe? What mysteries remain? I will cover our knowledge of black holes as of 2020, and what we might learn next.

About the Speaker:
Dr. Christopher Matzner is a Professor and Graduate Associate Chair of U of T’s David A. Dunlap Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics. Prof. Matzner is currently conducting research on aspects of star formation (protostellar disks, molecular clouds, energy feedback) and stellar explosions (supernovae, gamma ray bursts).

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